The Behan Law Group, P.L.L.C.

520-220-5047

1-877-MISS-DUI / 1-877-647-7384

Se Habla Español
945 N. Stone Ave, Tucson, AZ 85705

Arizona DUI AttorneyIn a state where the penalties for driving under the influence are severe, it is easy to become confused on your rights when being pulled over for a DUI. The Behan Law Group wants you to understand your rights if you are stopped and investigated for a DUI. 

What is a Field Sobriety Test and a Chemical Test?  In Arizona, officers use two different types of tests to check a driver for DUI: field sobriety tests and chemical tests. Field sobriety tests are subjective tests that an officer might ask you to perform on the side of the road, such as the Horizontal Gaze Nystagmus Test, the Walk and Turn Test, the One-Leg Stand Test etc. On the other hand, chemical tests check your blood alcohol concentration (BAC) level by testing your blood, breath, or urine. Breathalyzers, urine samples, and blood draws are all types of chemical tests.

Can I refuse to take sobriety tests?  Yes and no.  While it’s true that you cannot be forced to take a sobriety test, there are some consequences for refusing.  The fact that refused can be used against you in court in some cases.

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Posted on in DUI

Arizona DUI AttorneyMany drivers in Arizona mistakenly believe that you must physically be driving a car to be charged with a DUI. However, simply sitting in the driver’s seat and smelling like alcohol may be enough to get arrested for DUI.

Arizona law prohibits driving or being in actual physical control of a car while impaired. While actual physical control is not greatly defined, Arizona courts will often use several factors to determine whether a person had the intent to drive while intoxicated. These factors often include:

  • Whether the vehicle was running or whether the ignition was on;
  • Where the driver was found, and in what position;
  • Where the keys were located;
  • The weather conditions and time of day;
  • Whether the driver voluntarily pulled over;
  • Whether the driver was awake or asleep;
  • Whether the windows were up or down;
  • If the heater or air conditioner was on;
  • Where the vehicle was stopped;
  • Whether the headlights were on

The Court applies these factors to determine if the driver had the immediate ability to drive away. If the Court believes that the driver had the ability to immediately drive off, then the Court often finds that the driver had actual physical control.

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Arizona DUI AttorneyFrom recent high school graduates to college students, many underage drivers in Arizona are finding out that, while DUI consequences are certainly severe, it can be even worse if you receive an underage DUI.

If you have been charged with a DUI while under the age of 21, the following information is important for you to understand.

What are the Laws for Underage Drinking and Driving?  A.R.S. §4-244 (34) makes driving under the influence as a minor illegal. This underage DUI statute, which is titled “Minor Driving with Liquor in Body,”  is often called “Baby DUI” [insert link to statute] by police, prosecutors, and defense attorneys in Arizona.  

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Arizona DUI AttorneyMany drivers facing a DUI charge in Arizona ask the same question: when are breath test results admissible as evidence against me? If you have been charged with a DUI, it is important to know the difference between the Portable Breath Test (PBT) and an Intoxilyzer:

Portable Breath Test (PBT).  This handheld device is often used by officer during the initial DUI investigation. However, because these tests are widely considered unreliable and inaccurate, the PBT test is not admissible to be used against you as evidence. Remember, you are not required to submit to a PBT test under any circumstances.  [internal link to pbt blog]

Intoxilyzer.  The second form of breath testing is through the Intoxilyzer 8000, which Arizona uses as its breath test device. However, unlike the PBT, the results from the Intoxilyzer 8000 can be admissible as evidence against you in court.

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Tucson DUI Charge Attorney If you have been pulled over on a suspicion of drinking and driving in Arizona, an officer may perform a blood draw on you to test for either alcohol or drugs. If your blood has been drawn, the officer will obtain two vials to test by the State’s crime lab. However, whether your blood was drawn or a sample of your breath was captured, you have a right to have your blood independently tested.

 Both the Constitution and Arizona Law discuss that a DUI suspect has the right to obtain an independent blood alcohol test. A driver must be allowed to counter the state’s scientific evidence of intoxication with the defendant’s own scientific evidence.

 There are many challenges to a blood draw. For example, blood contamination, improper storing, incorrect labeling, improper collection, and a break in the police’s chain of custody are all ways to show that the blood evidence against you may have been compromised.

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